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Ulva intestinalis  (Gutweed)

Green and delicate sweet, mild seaweed at the top of the shoreline and forageable even in the middle of winter

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Chondrus crispus (Irish moss, carrageen)

This unassuming red seaweed hides  amazing culinary properties in small, tough fronds

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Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom)

Low night temperatures trigger this delicious and abundant fungus to fruit

(Not ready to forage for oyster mushrooms yet?  Try growing your own with a kit from Kitchen Mycology)

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Geum urbanum (Clove root, wood avens)

Another ubiquitous weed with edible leaves and flowers, and fragrant roots 

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Polysiphonia lanosa (Wrack syphon weed)

The scent and flavour of this small, coarse seaweed pack a tremendous punch

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Inonotus obliquus (Chaga)

This parasitic fungus is famous for the traditional medicinal use of its sclerotium 

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Fagus sylvatica (beech)

While most leaves have fallen, dry brown leaves still cling to some beech trees and hedges

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Heracleum sphondylium (common hogweed)

Throughout winter, even in snow, pungent papery seeds cling to the desiccated flower umbels of common hogweed

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