First Green

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Betula pendula (Birch, White Birch)

Beautiful, recognisable birches have long played an important role as food, drink, and medicine for us.

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Porphyra sp (Lavers, Nori, Slake)

Porphyra grows on rocks in shallow water, and when the tide is low, covers the rocks like shiny sheets of black plastic.  

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Auricularia auricula-judae (Wood Ear Mushroom, Jelly Ear)

These fun, unmistakable, and versatile fungi are at their best in early spring

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Fallopia japonica (Japanese Knotweed, Giant Knotweed)

Look for the beautiful pink spears, poking out in troops along the rivers and in urban waste sites.

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Osmundea pinnatifida (Pepper Dulse)

 In spite of its diminutive size, pepper dulse packs a tremendous flavour punch- spicy with a garlicky, truffle-y pungency.

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Allium ursinum (Wild Garlic, Bear Garlic, Ramsons)

If I could choose only one single wild plant to forage, it would have to be our native wild garlic, Allium ursinum, ransoms or bear garlic.

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Ribes sanguineum (Flowering Currant)

 A native to Western North America, this lovely shrub is popular in Edinburgh gardens and is occasionally feral in our woods.

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Cardamine hirsuta  (Hairy Bittercress, Spring Cress)

This tasty little weed might be growing just by your own back door (it does by mine); give it a nibble and see if you don’t fall in love with this delicate, peppery wild herb.

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Allium paradoxum (Few Flowered Leek, Wild Garlic)

This time of year, the banks of our waterways are lushly swathed in edible carpets of wild garlic.